Cristian, Commercial Airline Pilot

“I found QuietOn earplugs while online searching for some noise cancelling headphones. One of the largest problems that airline pilots are facing, including me, is dealing with the noise in the cockpit, which also affects our hearing after years of flying. Every pilot is trying to reduce the noise during long flights with either headphones or basic earplugs. At the same time, the pilot has to make sure that he or she can still hear clearly the other pilot and the air traffic controller through speakers, which can be a bit tricky sometimes.

After having tested a few different noise cancelling headphones and some normal earplugs, I got to test the QuietOn earplugs. To my pleasant surprise, they are really working! First time I was afraid to insert them deep in my ear, but then I found that they are working better once they are inserted properly. The background noise was reduced, but the volume level of another person’s voice was still all right, so I could hear the other pilot well enough. On a scale of 1 to 10 I would rate these earplugs as a 9. Now my hearing is safe and I can enjoy flying in quiet!”

WHY ARE QUIETON NOISE CANCELLING EARPLUGS AN OPTIMAL SOLUTION FOR AIRLINE PILOTS?

QuietOn with Active Noise Cancelling technology make a big difference at low frequencies, such as the hum of airplane engines, construction sites or normal background noise with an attenuation ability in this area is up to 40dB. For instance, airplane cabin noise sounds like a faint hum while wearing QuietOn earplugs. The earplugs significantly reduce stress levels caused by constant airplane cabin noise. However, at mid frequencies the noise reduction is lower, which means the airline pilots can still talk to and hear their colleagues voice.

QuietOn Active Noice Cancelling EarplugsSCIENTIFIC FACTS ABOUT  NOISE AND ITS EFFECTS ON AIRCRAFT PILOTS ?

“Keep in mind that permanent hearing damage can occur from sounds louder than 85 dB, physical pain occurs at around 125 dB, and an eardrum may burst at 140 dB. The Occupational Safety and Health Organization (OSHA) states that the maximum level of “safe” exposure to loud sounds is 90 dB for up to eight hours, or 100 dB for up to two hours. OSHA requires that workers exposed to noise levels higher than 85 dB must use hearing protection equipment. 

Hearing loss caused by noise is a huge problem for all pilots and flight instructors, especially those who fly small aircraft. Think about it: Day after day, flight after flight, pilots are subjected to a constant din from the engines, exhaust, propeller, fuselage and other areas. And unlike other noisy professions, pilots are generally subjected to the same noise frequency and intensity for extended periods of time.

If the ambient noise level inside your cockpit reaches 90 dBA, you should be using hearing protection equipment. A good set of headsets are essential, especially if in-cockpit noise levels exceed OSHA exposure limits. Active noise reduction headsets are recommended because they improve signal-to-noise ratios and enhance sound quality.” 

Source: http://www.businessaircraftcenter.com/articles/private-aircraft-pilots-hearing-loss-art0312.htm

 

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